Getting Better: Choosing a Greater Happiness

The last few mornings I have been reading and meditating on the following passage from a book entitled The Still Point Dhammapada:

“By giving up a lesser happiness one may gain a much greater one. Let the wise give up the lesser to attain the greater.”

As I sat, repeating that passage to myself . . . . → Read More: Getting Better: Choosing a Greater Happiness

Adjusting Medicine Over The Summer Part I–Antidepressants

A common question as we head into the summer months is what to do about medications. Most parents (and some kids) are very reluctant to change medications over the school year since a return of symptoms covered by the medicine can be very, very disruptive. Summertime is the logical time to consider some changes. Antidepressants . . . → Read More: Adjusting Medicine Over The Summer Part I–Antidepressants

Peeling The Onion–More Is Not Always Better

Once again . . . I find I am on the receiving end of another doc’s desperate attempt to control symptoms. The layering of medicine on top of medicine is an inherent problem in Western Medicine. After all, we are spending more and more of our hard earned dollars to go to see someone for . . . → Read More: Peeling The Onion–More Is Not Always Better

Book Report: The Book I Wish I Had Written . . . The Do-It-Yourself Guide To Fighting The Big Motherfuckin’ Sad by Adam Gnade

Once loyal readers may have noticed I have not been posting too much recently. Not to say I haven’t thought about it . . . it just seems like between work and home and everything in between my creative juices were tapped just keeping things going. Life is like that, no? I have been reading, . . . → Read More: Book Report: The Book I Wish I Had Written . . . The Do-It-Yourself Guide To Fighting The Big Motherfuckin’ Sad by Adam Gnade

The Cost Of Ignoring ADHD

I interviewed a young man this past week who had recently had to take a second medical withdrawal from a prestigious (and expensive) university because of debilitating symptoms of depression. It struck him in the spring semester last year (his Freshman year) and then again this fall. Over the summer, he had seemed to get . . . → Read More: The Cost Of Ignoring ADHD

Toxic Effects of Chronic Stress–Bad for Adults, Even Worse For Kids

I came across an article in the September/October 2012 issue of Scientific American MIND concerning the effect that stress can have on children and their capacity to learn. The researcher summarized years of work and ongoing studies showing the effect of stress hormones on the developing neural connections in the prefrontal cortex (the part of . . . → Read More: Toxic Effects of Chronic Stress–Bad for Adults, Even Worse For Kids

“So What Does It Mean To Be Emotionally Well?”

I was working a health fair last weekend. Standing there at my table with my big ol’ sign behind me announcing myself as a “Partner in the Pursuit of Emotional Wellness” was interesting to say the least. Being a shrink is an odd job. I am more used to talking to people about their deepest . . . → Read More: “So What Does It Mean To Be Emotionally Well?”

Advocating For Access To Mental Health Care . . . It Is Time For Us To Stand Up For What Is Right

I am encouraging you to go to Philmont Guidance Center’s Facebook page and listen to a 6-minute video I uploaded there. Get past the boring talking head thing (psychiatrists tend to be a bit dry sometimes) and LISTEN to what he is saying and THINK about what this will mean if the trend is generalized . . . → Read More: Advocating For Access To Mental Health Care . . . It Is Time For Us To Stand Up For What Is Right

In Sickness and In Health . . . Lessons Learned From My Patients

Gabrielle Giffords and her husband Mark Kelly have made a few appearances lately, telling their story of bravery and determination following the horrific shooting in January that left Giffords near death. Giffords’ has made a near miraculous recovery, due in large part to a hefty dose of luck, and the determination of those around her, . . . → Read More: In Sickness and In Health . . . Lessons Learned From My Patients

A Tale Of Two Kiddies . . . How Early Treatment Makes A Difference (with apologies to Charles Dickens)

I started seeing Mike when he was six years old or so. Brought in by his mother, he was having all the classic problems that a child with ADHD has. He was inattentive and distracted. He was disorganized and was losing things. He couldn’t sit still and would get in trouble for talking and playing when he was supposed to be sitting still and doing his work. He was described as “lazy” when, in reality, that “lazy” was the standard disengaged and distracted “ain’t too interested in doing something I can’t pay attention to” thing we here in mental health land can easily diagnose as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. . . . → Read More: A Tale Of Two Kiddies . . . How Early Treatment Makes A Difference (with apologies to Charles Dickens)